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American Agri-Women's Drive Across American Tour stops in Montana

The American Agri-Women are celebrating 40 years of agriculture advocacy with the Drive Across America tour. National President, Sue McCrum, is taking a 5-month drive across America in the custom wrapped AAW pick-up, and was in Montana for a few days in July.  

Northern Ag Network thanks Karen Yost, Nutralix (former AAW National President) for bringing Sue and crew by our office for an interview. What a great interruption on a Friday afternoon in the summer!

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Montana Cowboy Hall of Fame announces 2015 inductions

Today the Montana Cowboy Hall of Fame & Western Heritage Center (MCHF & WHC) announced the eighth class of inductions into the Montana Cowboy Hall of Fame. The inductees were chosen from a field of candidates nominated by the general public. Inductees are honored for their notable contributions to the history and culture of Montana.

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MSU livestock specialist Tommy Bass responds to avian flu H5N2 outbreak

BOZEMAN - Montana State University Extension livestock environment associate specialist Tommy Bass recently responded to the epicenter of an Avian Influenza H5N2 outbreak as a representative of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. An animal mortality expert, Bass served in mid-May as part of the agency’s comprehensive disaster response team in Willmar, Minn., which was hit hard by the H5N2 virus.

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Crop losses to Montana hailstorm estimated in the millions

GREAT FALLS, MT. - Farmers are harvesting what remains of their winter wheat after hailstorms in a northern Montana county earlier this month destroyed an estimated $7.5 million in crops.

The Great Falls Tribune reports almost 182,000 acres were impacted by hailstorms that Hill County Farm Service Agency executive director Les Rispens says were probably the most significant to hit the state in years.

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Have plan to lessen heat stress in cattle

With warm weather in the forecast, cattle producers need to have a plan to lessen heat stress in their animals.

Heat stress has the greatest impacts when cattle are exposed to a combination of elevated temperatures and humidity for a period of time, according to North Dakota State University Extension Service animal experts. Hot and humid conditions during the day can stress cattle, but cooler temperatures at night will provide relief for cattle and equip them to face warmer daytime temperatures.

“If forecast models are correct, daytime highs in the upper Great Plains may be in the 80s to 90s, but the nighttime temperatures in the mid-60s should allow for nighttime cooling,” Extension livestock stewardship specialist and veterinarian Gerald Stokka says. “However, as we progress into the hottest part of the summer, a quick review of steps producers can take to manage and monitor conditions for heat stress is in order.”

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